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Perfect Peach Cobbler using Frozen Peaches

The perfect ending to a summertime barbeque is peach cobbler.  The problem we have in my area of the Midwest is that it isn’t always easy to get really good fresh peaches.  So, I was excited to try this modified recipe from Cook’s Illustrated, as it calls for the use of frozen peaches. I also like this recipe, because it takes care of the biggest problem with making peach cobbler, i.e., not knowing how much juice your peaches will release during baking.  Because the sugar you mix with the peaches draws out the moisture, you can control how much liquid to put back into the cobbler after draining the mixture. This enables you to get consistent results every time!

Note: You need to start thawing the peaches 2 hours before you start this recipe.

Ingredients

Filling

2 1/2 pounds frozen peaches
¼ cup granulated sugar (1 3/4 ounces)
1 teaspoon cornstarch
1 tablespoon lemon juice from 1 lemon
Pinch table salt

Biscuit Topping

2 cups unbleached all-purpose flour (10 ounces)
6 tablespoons granulated sugar, plus 2 additional teaspoons
1 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon table salt
10 tablespoons unsalted butter (cold), cut into 1/4-inch cubes
1 cup plain whole-milk Greek yogurt (I used Greek yogurt, as I could not find any other whole-milk yogurt.)

Instructions

Adjust oven rack to lower-middle position and heat oven to 425 degrees.

Defrost peaches completely in colander. Gently toss peaches and sugar together in large bowl. Let stand for 30 minutes, tossing several times.

Drain peaches in colander set over large bowl. Whisk 1/4 cup of drained juice (discard extra), cornstarch, lemon juice, and salt together in a small bowl.

Toss peach-juice mixture with peach slices and transfer to 8-inch-square glass baking dish.

Bake until peaches begin to bubble around edges, about 15 to 20 minutes.

While peaches are baking, pulse in food processor flour, 3 tablespoons sugar, baking powder, baking soda, and salt to combine.

Scatter butter over and pulse until mixture resembles coarse meal, about ten 1-second pulses. (You can also accomplish this step by “cutting” the butter into the mixture using two knives.  This process is explained more fully in my soda bread post.)

Transfer to medium bowl. Add yogurt and toss with rubber spatula until cohesive dough is formed. (Add extra yogurt if the dough is not coming together. Don’t overmix dough or biscuits will be tough.) Break dough into 9 evenly sized but roughly shaped mounds and set aside.

When peaches bubble around edges, remove baking dish from oven and place dough mounds on top, spacing them at least 1/2 inch apart (they should not touch). Sprinkle each mound with portion of remaining 2 teaspoons of sugar.

Bake until topping is golden brown, about 18 minutes. Cool cobbler on wire rack until warm, about 20 minutes. Serve and enjoy!

Perfect Peach Cobbler with Frozen Peaches

Perfect Peach Cobbler using Frozen Peaches
Author: 
Recipe type: Baked Goods
 
The perfect ending to a summertime barbeque is peach cobbler.  The problem we have in my area of the Midwest is that it isn't always easy to get really good fresh peaches.  So, I was excited to try this modified recipe from Cook's Illustrated, as it calls for the use of frozen peaches. I also like this recipe, because it takes care of the biggest problem with making peach cobbler, i.e., not knowing how much juice your peaches will release during baking.  Because the sugar you mix with the peaches draws out the moisture, you can control how much liquid to put back into the cobbler after draining the mixture. This enables you to get consistent results every time!
Ingredients
  • Note: You need to start thawing the peaches 2 hours before you start this recipe.
  • Filling
  • 2½ pounds frozen peaches
  • ¼ cup granulated sugar (1¾ ounces)
  • 1 teaspoon cornstarch
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice from 1 lemon
  • Pinch table salt
  • Biscuit Topping
  • 2 cups unbleached all-purpose flour (10 ounces)
  • 6 tablespoons granulated sugar, plus 2 additional teaspoons
  • 1½ teaspoon baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon baking soda
  • ½ teaspoon table salt
  • 10 tablespoons unsalted butter (cold), cut into ¼-inch cubes
  • 1 cup plain whole-milk Greek yogurt (I used Greek yogurt, as I could not find any other whole-milk yogurt.)
Instructions
  1. Adjust oven rack to lower-middle position and heat oven to 425 degrees.
  2. Defrost peaches completely in colander. Gently toss peaches and sugar together in large bowl. Let stand for 30 minutes, tossing several times.
  3. Drain peaches in colander set over large bowl. Whisk ¼ cup of drained juice (discard extra), cornstarch, lemon juice, and salt together in a small bowl.
  4. Toss peach-juice mixture with peach slices and transfer to 8-inch-square glass baking dish.
  5. Bake until peaches begin to bubble around edges, about 15 to 20 minutes.
  6. While peaches are baking, pulse in food processor flour, 3 tablespoons sugar, baking powder, baking soda, and salt to combine.
  7. Scatter butter over and pulse until mixture resembles coarse meal, about ten 1-second pulses. (You can also accomplish this step by "cutting" the butter into the mixture using two knives.  This process is explained more fully in my soda bread post.)
  8. Transfer to medium bowl. Add yogurt and toss with rubber spatula until cohesive dough is formed. (Add extra yogurt if the dough is not coming together. Don't overmix dough or biscuits will be tough.) Break dough into 9 evenly sized but roughly shaped mounds and set aside.
  9. When peaches bubble around edges, remove baking dish from oven and place dough mounds on top, spacing them at least ½ inch apart (they should not touch). Sprinkle each mound with portion of remaining 2 teaspoons of sugar.
  10. Bake until topping is golden brown, about 18 minutes. Cool cobbler on wire rack until warm, about 20 minutes. Serve and enjoy!
 

About Daddy

I am a husband and a father of two kids with whom I love to cook and eat. In this blog, I hope to share with you not only some of my, as well as my family’s, favorite recipes, but also some interesting things I have learned or done as a husband, father, and cook.

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